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Celebrating 100 years of Standards Australia

October 12, 2022

Statements

Today, one of the most unsung but stalwart institutions of our nation, Standards Australia, is celebrating 100 years in the Australian community.

Nearly everything we touch has a standard connected to it. From the beds we sleep in and the food we consume, to the cars we drive and the places we call home.

There are up to 10,000 standards across a range of sectors from manufacturing and construction to energy and mining, public safety, communications, and information technology, transport, health, logistics and beyond.

“Our story began with the first standard used to help build the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1922,” said Adrian O’Connell, Chief Executive Officer of Standards Australia.

“Over the last 100 years, thousands of standards have been created to help build and protect Australia’s most beloved national icons, and given us the confidence to travel, shop and build, knowing we are safe from inconsistent or dangerous practices.”

Australia’s $1.8 trillion economy cannot operate without Australian Standards™, which surround and protect our everyday lives from the moment we get up in the morning, to the time we go to bed.

Standards have played a critical role in the creation and protection of some of Australia’s most unique national icons including Melbourne trams, the Port Arthur heritage site in Hobart, and lighting towers at the Sydney Cricket Ground, and the city of Darwin, which had to be completely rebuilt after Cyclone Tracy in 1974.

“Some standards have inevitably come from largely unforeseen calamities of the past – including cyclones, floods and fires, and safety incidents like road and train accidents.”

“Most standards, however, are created by looking to the future, and the overwhelming bulk have been designed by forward-planning teams of experts, thanks to advances in science and technology, and our continued focus on solving the challenges of tomorrow,” Mr O’Connell said.

The future is changing at pace, with up to 4,000 new standards needed in the next decade to safeguard our way of life.

“We couldn’t have met this momentous milestone without the support of our many stakeholders, contributors, members and staff – thank you.”


Contact
Jess Dunne
Celebrating 100 years of Standards Australia
+ 61 2 9237 6381
Email and link here

Today, one of the most unsung but stalwart institutions of our nation, Standards Australia, is celebrating 100 years in the Australian community.

Nearly everything we touch has a standard connected to it. From the beds we sleep in and the food we consume, to the cars we drive and the places we call home.

There are up to 10,000 standards across a range of sectors from manufacturing and construction to energy and mining, public safety, communications, and information technology, transport, health, logistics and beyond.

“Our story began with the first standard used to help build the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1922,” said Adrian O’Connell, Chief Executive Officer of Standards Australia.

“Over the last 100 years, thousands of standards have been created to help build and protect Australia’s most beloved national icons, and given us the confidence to travel, shop and build, knowing we are safe from inconsistent or dangerous practices.”

Australia’s $1.8 trillion economy cannot operate without Australian Standards™, which surround and protect our everyday lives from the moment we get up in the morning, to the time we go to bed.

Standards have played a critical role in the creation and protection of some of Australia’s most unique national icons including Melbourne trams, the Port Arthur heritage site in Hobart, and lighting towers at the Sydney Cricket Ground, and the city of Darwin, which had to be completely rebuilt after Cyclone Tracy in 1974.

“Some standards have inevitably come from largely unforeseen calamities of the past – including cyclones, floods and fires, and safety incidents like road and train accidents.”

“Most standards, however, are created by looking to the future, and the overwhelming bulk have been designed by forward-planning teams of experts, thanks to advances in science and technology, and our continued focus on solving the challenges of tomorrow,” Mr O’Connell said.

The future is changing at pace, with up to 4,000 new standards needed in the next decade to safeguard our way of life.

“We couldn’t have met this momentous milestone without the support of our many stakeholders, contributors, members and staff – thank you.”


Contact
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381
jess.dunne@standards.org.au
Adam Stingemore
General Manager, Engagement and Communications
+61 2 9237 6086
Chris Larsen
Senior Manager Communications & Design
+ 0431 900 712
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381