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Cool change will see Australian homes pump up the heat

May 12, 2020

Statements

  • While COVID-19 restrictions are lifting, the arrival of winter means individuals are still keen to stay indoors and keep warm with the help of their heaters.
  • Australian Standards set out requirements for the safe design, use and energy consumption of heaters and similar electrical appliances heavily used in winter.
  • By making use of energy efficient products and decreasing temperatures by one degree, households can save on their electricity bill that tends to rise in the colder months.

Winter has well and truly settled in for 2020, and with temperatures dropping the heaters are coming out of the garage, sweaters are being dusted off and the energy bill is likely going up as we choose to spend even more time in the comfort of our homes.

“COVID-19 for majority of Australians meant remaining indoors, and now that the winter months are here that will likely not change as people choose to stay indoors and enjoy the warmth and comfort of their home. It’s important Australian households making use of heaters to stay cosy can feel confident in the safety of their appliances,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey.

“The cooler months see a 10% increase in the number of house fires, with many of these caused by heaters and electric blankets [1], standards aim to build confidence and assist in the safety and integrity of heating systems.”

Alongside safety considerations, with an increase in use of heating and heating appliances consumers also often see a rise in their household energy bill. The minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) help consumers make choices about the type of product they want to purchase by the amount of energy it consumes.

“Energy consumption and efficiency is front of mind for plenty of individuals and statistics show households can save 10% for each degree they decrease their air conditioners [2]. Minimum energy performance standards are an important tool in assisting consumers make choices about the product they want to install or use in their home,” said Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Institute of Refrigeration Air Conditioning and Heating (AIRAH), Tony Gleeson.

“Temperatures may be cooling, but the work we do in developing guidance to support consumer energy needs certainly is not. We are continuing to work alongside industry, regulators and government to develop standards to support the effective management of energy and producing guidance with an aim of protecting Australian consumers,” concluded Mr Chidgey.

[1] https://www.fire.nsw.gov.au/page.php?id=9201

[2] https://www.energy.gov.au/households/heating-and-cooling

Contact
Communications Department
Cool change will see Australian homes pump up the heat
Email and link here
  • While COVID-19 restrictions are lifting, the arrival of winter means individuals are still keen to stay indoors and keep warm with the help of their heaters.
  • Australian Standards set out requirements for the safe design, use and energy consumption of heaters and similar electrical appliances heavily used in winter.
  • By making use of energy efficient products and decreasing temperatures by one degree, households can save on their electricity bill that tends to rise in the colder months.

Winter has well and truly settled in for 2020, and with temperatures dropping the heaters are coming out of the garage, sweaters are being dusted off and the energy bill is likely going up as we choose to spend even more time in the comfort of our homes.

“COVID-19 for majority of Australians meant remaining indoors, and now that the winter months are here that will likely not change as people choose to stay indoors and enjoy the warmth and comfort of their home. It’s important Australian households making use of heaters to stay cosy can feel confident in the safety of their appliances,” said Head of Stakeholder Engagement, Daniel Chidgey.

“The cooler months see a 10% increase in the number of house fires, with many of these caused by heaters and electric blankets [1], standards aim to build confidence and assist in the safety and integrity of heating systems.”

Alongside safety considerations, with an increase in use of heating and heating appliances consumers also often see a rise in their household energy bill. The minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) help consumers make choices about the type of product they want to purchase by the amount of energy it consumes.

“Energy consumption and efficiency is front of mind for plenty of individuals and statistics show households can save 10% for each degree they decrease their air conditioners [2]. Minimum energy performance standards are an important tool in assisting consumers make choices about the product they want to install or use in their home,” said Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Institute of Refrigeration Air Conditioning and Heating (AIRAH), Tony Gleeson.

“Temperatures may be cooling, but the work we do in developing guidance to support consumer energy needs certainly is not. We are continuing to work alongside industry, regulators and government to develop standards to support the effective management of energy and producing guidance with an aim of protecting Australian consumers,” concluded Mr Chidgey.

[1] https://www.fire.nsw.gov.au/page.php?id=9201

[2] https://www.energy.gov.au/households/heating-and-cooling

Contact
Communications Department
communications@standards.org.au
communications@standards.org.au
Adam Stingemore
General Manager, Engagement and Communications
+61 2 9237 6086
Chris Larsen
Senior Manager Communications & Design
+ 0431 900 712
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381