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Power boat standard up to speed

August 26, 2021

Statements

  • AS 1799.1:2009, Small craft, Part 1: General requirements for power boats, has been revised to align with current industry design and construction.
  • An assessment of compliance to Australian regulation found AS 1799.1:2009 raised concerns around interpretation and out of date methodologies.
  • The revision aims to support industry in compliance and safety.

Australian Standard AS 1799.1:2009, Small craft, Part 1: General requirements for power boats, has been revised after a recent assessment found the standard was no longer current.

AS 1799.1:2009 is referenced in the Australian Builders Plate standard (ABP) which is enforced nationwide under maritime safety or consumer protection law. The ABP is an information plate attached to most power boats and includes information about the boat, such as maximum persons and load capacity, engine power and more.

An assessment of compliance to ABP standard found AS 1799.1:2009 is out of step with global industry developments, new assessment methodologies and raised concerns around interpretation.

“International boating industry standards have benefitted from ongoing improvement processes during the last ten years, and it is important that AS 1799.1 also undergoes a revision to remain current and of value to the boating community and its overall safety,” said Roland Terry-Lloyd, Head of Standards Development at Standards Australia.

To align with industry developments, Standards Australia Technical Committee CS-114, Small Craft up to 35m, has recently published AS 1799.1:2021, Small craft, Part 1: General requirements for power boats. The newly revised standard addresses needed changes across safety improvements and testing methodologies and gives industry a single, uniquely Australian document to better achieve regulatory compliance.

“It sets a benchmark that provides for all manufacturers to work to a common standard and to then compete on quality and design innovation, rather than using alternate standards developed to suit non-Australian markets,” said Nik Parker, Chair of CS-114.

The revision aims to positively impact the safety of consumers through redefining the make-up of the persons capacity, clarification of inclusions in determining maximum load capacity and addressing requirements to support prevention from falling overboard.

AS 1799.1 provides the Australian marine industry with a common standard to which small crafts are designed, constructed and assessed for performance.

“Now that industry has access to one single, uniquely Australian standard, the hope is that it will be the standard of choice for demonstrating compliance with the ABP and allow for better education and improvements on safety processes,” Mr Parker concluded.

The recently published standard is: AS 1799.1:2021, Small craft, Part 1: General requirements for power boats

Image supplied by Yamaha Motor Australia and Cruise Craft Boats.

Contact
Jess Dunne
Power boat standard up to speed
+ 61 2 9237 6381
Email and link here
  • AS 1799.1:2009, Small craft, Part 1: General requirements for power boats, has been revised to align with current industry design and construction.
  • An assessment of compliance to Australian regulation found AS 1799.1:2009 raised concerns around interpretation and out of date methodologies.
  • The revision aims to support industry in compliance and safety.

Australian Standard AS 1799.1:2009, Small craft, Part 1: General requirements for power boats, has been revised after a recent assessment found the standard was no longer current.

AS 1799.1:2009 is referenced in the Australian Builders Plate standard (ABP) which is enforced nationwide under maritime safety or consumer protection law. The ABP is an information plate attached to most power boats and includes information about the boat, such as maximum persons and load capacity, engine power and more.

An assessment of compliance to ABP standard found AS 1799.1:2009 is out of step with global industry developments, new assessment methodologies and raised concerns around interpretation.

“International boating industry standards have benefitted from ongoing improvement processes during the last ten years, and it is important that AS 1799.1 also undergoes a revision to remain current and of value to the boating community and its overall safety,” said Roland Terry-Lloyd, Head of Standards Development at Standards Australia.

To align with industry developments, Standards Australia Technical Committee CS-114, Small Craft up to 35m, has recently published AS 1799.1:2021, Small craft, Part 1: General requirements for power boats. The newly revised standard addresses needed changes across safety improvements and testing methodologies and gives industry a single, uniquely Australian document to better achieve regulatory compliance.

“It sets a benchmark that provides for all manufacturers to work to a common standard and to then compete on quality and design innovation, rather than using alternate standards developed to suit non-Australian markets,” said Nik Parker, Chair of CS-114.

The revision aims to positively impact the safety of consumers through redefining the make-up of the persons capacity, clarification of inclusions in determining maximum load capacity and addressing requirements to support prevention from falling overboard.

AS 1799.1 provides the Australian marine industry with a common standard to which small crafts are designed, constructed and assessed for performance.

“Now that industry has access to one single, uniquely Australian standard, the hope is that it will be the standard of choice for demonstrating compliance with the ABP and allow for better education and improvements on safety processes,” Mr Parker concluded.

The recently published standard is: AS 1799.1:2021, Small craft, Part 1: General requirements for power boats

Image supplied by Yamaha Motor Australia and Cruise Craft Boats.

Contact
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381
jess.dunne@standards.org.au
Adam Stingemore
General Manager, Engagement and Communications
+61 2 9237 6086
Chris Larsen
Senior Manager Communications & Design
+ 0431 900 712
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381