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Standards Australia’s Update Helps Parents Stroll with Confidence

June 24, 2022

Statements

  • The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) revised its mandatory safety standard for prams and strollers to include convertible trikes.
  • Safety requirements updates for prams, strollers and now convertible trikes.
  • Standards Australia has updated its standard to support manufacturers in meeting minimum requirements for convertible trikes and better support consumers’ safety.


Today, Standards Australia has published AS 2088:2022, Prams and strollers, superseding the 2013 version.

In recent years, convertible trikes have been growing in popularity as an alternative to prams or strollers as they can be customised to accommodate for children’s growth.

Originally offered to market as a toy, the trikes can be used as a stroller or as a tricycle for older children.

In 2019, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) revised its mandatory safety standard for prams and strollers to include convertible trikes as a legitimate stroller or wheeled vehicle “that can operate in more than one mode”[1].

In 2020, consumer advocacy organisation CHOICE tested nine convertible trikes, finding that six of them failed safety requirements[2] set out in the Australian standard, enforced by the ACCC.

Reasons for failure included missing tether straps, no harnesses, or ineffective brakes.

Standards Australia’s technical committee CS-020 published its revision of AS/NZS 2088:2013, to provide clarity for convertible trike manufacturers and boost consumer confidence.

The standard specifies materials, construction, test methods, and labelling and performance requirements.

“Convertible trikes are a wonderful option for parents. They allow consumers to save money, as they don’t need to upgrade their products each year their child grows. And they are incredibly useful to children’s development, especially in refining their motor skills,” said Mike Lumley, Chair of CS-020.

“Naturally, it’s vital there is a standard for convertible trikes so they are made to minimum safety requirements. While the 2013 version of the standard covers a comprehensive range of areas, there was no consideration for convertible trikes at the time of development as they weren’t as popular as they are now,” Mr Lumley continued.

“Australia’s standard is as tough as any standard in the world, and we are confident in the testing and safety requirements it stipulates. However, stroller designs are changing all the time, so the standard won't be limited to just prams and strollers anymore.”

The inclusion for convertible trikes and other stroller-like vehicles (which children can sit and be restrained in) will guide manufacturers on the minimum safety requirements for their products, resulting in better consumer confidence and safety.

Additionally, the revision will remove the requirement that the frame of these ‘vehicles’ be locked at two separate points. Mr Lumley said that the standard had this requirement as there were no products without this feature on the market at the time.

“Since 2013, there have been a range of models developed which only lock in a central point that still meet the standard’s testing requirements,” Mr Lumley said.

“Standards Australia is committed to developing documents that support Australians at all stages of life, whatever their age. With the growing demand in stroller options, there was a need to update our pre-existing standards to ensure clarity around safety requirements. We hope this amend will support industry in avoiding recalls or potentially dangerous products,” said Adam Stingemore, General Manager of Engagement and Communications.


AS 2088, Prams and Strollers, is available for purchase via the Standards Store and the following distributors.

[1] Consumer Product Safety Standard for Prams and Strollers (legislation.gov.au)

[2] The convertible tricycle strollers that failed mandatory safety tests | CHOICE

Contact
Jess Dunne
Standards Australia’s Update Helps Parents Stroll with Confidence
+ 61 2 9237 6381
Email and link here
  • The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) revised its mandatory safety standard for prams and strollers to include convertible trikes.
  • Safety requirements updates for prams, strollers and now convertible trikes.
  • Standards Australia has updated its standard to support manufacturers in meeting minimum requirements for convertible trikes and better support consumers’ safety.


Today, Standards Australia has published AS 2088:2022, Prams and strollers, superseding the 2013 version.

In recent years, convertible trikes have been growing in popularity as an alternative to prams or strollers as they can be customised to accommodate for children’s growth.

Originally offered to market as a toy, the trikes can be used as a stroller or as a tricycle for older children.

In 2019, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) revised its mandatory safety standard for prams and strollers to include convertible trikes as a legitimate stroller or wheeled vehicle “that can operate in more than one mode”[1].

In 2020, consumer advocacy organisation CHOICE tested nine convertible trikes, finding that six of them failed safety requirements[2] set out in the Australian standard, enforced by the ACCC.

Reasons for failure included missing tether straps, no harnesses, or ineffective brakes.

Standards Australia’s technical committee CS-020 published its revision of AS/NZS 2088:2013, to provide clarity for convertible trike manufacturers and boost consumer confidence.

The standard specifies materials, construction, test methods, and labelling and performance requirements.

“Convertible trikes are a wonderful option for parents. They allow consumers to save money, as they don’t need to upgrade their products each year their child grows. And they are incredibly useful to children’s development, especially in refining their motor skills,” said Mike Lumley, Chair of CS-020.

“Naturally, it’s vital there is a standard for convertible trikes so they are made to minimum safety requirements. While the 2013 version of the standard covers a comprehensive range of areas, there was no consideration for convertible trikes at the time of development as they weren’t as popular as they are now,” Mr Lumley continued.

“Australia’s standard is as tough as any standard in the world, and we are confident in the testing and safety requirements it stipulates. However, stroller designs are changing all the time, so the standard won't be limited to just prams and strollers anymore.”

The inclusion for convertible trikes and other stroller-like vehicles (which children can sit and be restrained in) will guide manufacturers on the minimum safety requirements for their products, resulting in better consumer confidence and safety.

Additionally, the revision will remove the requirement that the frame of these ‘vehicles’ be locked at two separate points. Mr Lumley said that the standard had this requirement as there were no products without this feature on the market at the time.

“Since 2013, there have been a range of models developed which only lock in a central point that still meet the standard’s testing requirements,” Mr Lumley said.

“Standards Australia is committed to developing documents that support Australians at all stages of life, whatever their age. With the growing demand in stroller options, there was a need to update our pre-existing standards to ensure clarity around safety requirements. We hope this amend will support industry in avoiding recalls or potentially dangerous products,” said Adam Stingemore, General Manager of Engagement and Communications.


AS 2088, Prams and Strollers, is available for purchase via the Standards Store and the following distributors.

[1] Consumer Product Safety Standard for Prams and Strollers (legislation.gov.au)

[2] The convertible tricycle strollers that failed mandatory safety tests | CHOICE

Contact
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381
jess.dunne@standards.org.au
Adam Stingemore
General Manager, Engagement and Communications
+61 2 9237 6086
Chris Larsen
Senior Manager Communications & Design
+ 0431 900 712
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381