Notice

Please be advised you are about to leave the Standards Australia website to proceed to the AustLII website. Click OK to proceed.

Driving standardisation in road signs

September 10, 2021

Statements

  • With an increased focus on safety, road deaths have fallen in the past four decades by thousands.
  • Standards Australia has revised AS 1742.1, the first part of a fourteen-part series.
  • The standard provides guidance to users on regulating, warning and road signs.

In the past year, there were 1,100 road related deaths in Australia[1]. Since the introduction of road record keeping in 1925, there have been over 190,000 deaths on our roads. However, there has been a substantial decrease in road trauma levels in the last four decades despite significant population growth.

The decrease is due in part to the Australian Government committing to improved road safety[2]. Standardisation plays an important role in supporting this commitment.

Standards Australia has recently published AS 1742.1:2021, Manual of uniform traffic control devices, Part 1: General introduction and index of signs, which supersedes its 2014 predecessor.

The revision includes more than 250 new road signs used for regulating, warning and guiding road users. These signs provide clear and consistent messaging with the aim to support a reduction in the risk of crashes and road trauma. The standard also has information on the basic elements of signs, including shape, size, colour, lettering and symbols.

“With thousands of road deaths in Australia, having standards in place to help support safer roads is vital,” said Roland Terry-Lloyd, Head of Standards Development at Standards Australia.

AS 1742.1 is one of fourteen parts in the AS 1742, Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices, series. This part contains an index of all road signs allowed for use in Australia, including references to where users can find more information about each sign.

Additionally, the standard includes more than 200 multi-message signs that have been harmonised for use at roadwork sites as described in AS 1742.3, Traffic Control for Works on Roads.

“AS 1742.1:2021 is a must-have document for all practitioners working in the road design and traffic engineering sector in Australia. It is a quick reference where practitioners can find out what signs are available for use and where to find information about them,” said Thuan Nguyen, Chair of MS-012, Road Signs and Traffic Signals.

“I would like to thank the Working Group, the MS-012 committee members, in particular the member representing the Victoria Department of Transport who was the Drafting Leader of this standard, Standards Australia and everyone else who have been working and contributing to the update of this standard,” Mr Nguyen concluded.

The recently published standard is: AS 1742.1:2021, Manual of uniform traffic control devices, Part 1: General introduction and index of signs

[1]Safety Statistics | Bureau of Infrastructure and Transport Research Economics (bitre.gov.au)

[2]Road Safety (infrastructure.gov.au)

Contact
Jess Dunne
Driving standardisation in road signs
+ 61 2 9237 6381
Email and link here
  • With an increased focus on safety, road deaths have fallen in the past four decades by thousands.
  • Standards Australia has revised AS 1742.1, the first part of a fourteen-part series.
  • The standard provides guidance to users on regulating, warning and road signs.

In the past year, there were 1,100 road related deaths in Australia[1]. Since the introduction of road record keeping in 1925, there have been over 190,000 deaths on our roads. However, there has been a substantial decrease in road trauma levels in the last four decades despite significant population growth.

The decrease is due in part to the Australian Government committing to improved road safety[2]. Standardisation plays an important role in supporting this commitment.

Standards Australia has recently published AS 1742.1:2021, Manual of uniform traffic control devices, Part 1: General introduction and index of signs, which supersedes its 2014 predecessor.

The revision includes more than 250 new road signs used for regulating, warning and guiding road users. These signs provide clear and consistent messaging with the aim to support a reduction in the risk of crashes and road trauma. The standard also has information on the basic elements of signs, including shape, size, colour, lettering and symbols.

“With thousands of road deaths in Australia, having standards in place to help support safer roads is vital,” said Roland Terry-Lloyd, Head of Standards Development at Standards Australia.

AS 1742.1 is one of fourteen parts in the AS 1742, Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices, series. This part contains an index of all road signs allowed for use in Australia, including references to where users can find more information about each sign.

Additionally, the standard includes more than 200 multi-message signs that have been harmonised for use at roadwork sites as described in AS 1742.3, Traffic Control for Works on Roads.

“AS 1742.1:2021 is a must-have document for all practitioners working in the road design and traffic engineering sector in Australia. It is a quick reference where practitioners can find out what signs are available for use and where to find information about them,” said Thuan Nguyen, Chair of MS-012, Road Signs and Traffic Signals.

“I would like to thank the Working Group, the MS-012 committee members, in particular the member representing the Victoria Department of Transport who was the Drafting Leader of this standard, Standards Australia and everyone else who have been working and contributing to the update of this standard,” Mr Nguyen concluded.

The recently published standard is: AS 1742.1:2021, Manual of uniform traffic control devices, Part 1: General introduction and index of signs

[1]Safety Statistics | Bureau of Infrastructure and Transport Research Economics (bitre.gov.au)

[2]Road Safety (infrastructure.gov.au)

Contact
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381
jess.dunne@standards.org.au
Adam Stingemore
General Manager, Engagement and Communications
+61 2 9237 6086
Chris Larsen
Senior Manager Communications & Design
+ 0431 900 712
Jess Dunne
Communications Manager
+ 61 2 9237 6381